A Patient’s Story

A mother’s search for A Better Way to treat anaphylaxis

Michelle Lobel
Understands Life With
Severe Allergies

Bryn Co-Founder and Chief Inspiration Officer (CIO) Michelle Lobel knows a lot about the risk of anaphylaxis. Michelle has been prescribed an epinephrine auto-injector since her childhood. She knows too well about the dangers of not having your rescue medication on you or not being willing to use it in an emergency. She is the person who chose not to carry the EpiPen because it didn’t fit in her purse, which resulted in a trip to the emergency room. She is the person who had to rely on others to inject her, because she was too afraid to self-inject. She is the person who had a reaction so severe that she needed two doses of epinephrine, resulting in a trip to the hospital for a second dose to save her. As the mother of two severely allergic children, these memories became her nightmare and left her constantly living on edge. This experience has Michelle vigilant for the risks and dangers that lie ahead for her two children, Serena and Ben.

Taking Action

When Michelle and her family moved to Los Angeles, they moved next door to her co-founder, Steven Hartman. Their kids became fast friends and the epinephrine auto-injectors went back and forth with the kids. One night at a family dinner, Michelle was telling Steven and his wife, Hillary, about her dilemma and the risk it posed to the twins. Michelle wondered: Where was the innovation for people at risk for anaphylaxis? Why couldn’t the pharmaceutical industry build a better device – much as tech companies had transformed the awkward, oversized cell phones of the 1980s into the small, intuitive smartphones of today? Steven agreed that there was a need for a simple and elegant solution to this dilemma. From that moment, Bryn Pharma was born.

Today, they are proud to be leading the team developing a user-friendly, needle-free, portable intranasal epinephrine device that will not only help their family and friends, but yours too.